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HAE17

Google code : 
35°40'55.78

Description :
Address: Emamjomeh, Oudlajan, District 12, Tehran
Building type: Traditional residential
State: demolished
Lot area: 1037 sqm
Built area: 781 sqm
Floor area: (not available)
Year of construction: c. 1850
Period: Qajar
Architect: (not available)
Buildings: The house was a part of extensive building complex once comprised the residence of Mirza Aqa-Khan Noori (Chnacellor of Naser al-Din Shah court form 1851 to 1857) after the division of the complex, this part, for a while, was used as Andarouni (inside) section of the neighbouring building (HAF17). Built with traditional Iranian courtyard layout, the building had constructions on four sides. The entrance on the south-east corner of the house, led through the courtyard. The main part of the house, constituting a double floor height Iwan and Talar (Hall) was situated on the northern part of the courtyard. In Talar, three tall wooden sashed windows (Orosi) with stained glasse panels adorned by delicate Arabesque designs, opened to the Iwan. The four columns of Iwan had stucco and stone-carving designs on capital and base which resembles European decorations. Frieze decorations showed European influence as well. Stucco carving of curved pediment displayed two lion and sun motifs, positioned symmetrically. The building was demolished in the early 1990s. [1]
Exteriors: In remaining pictures there is no sign of traditional garden layout.
Features: Courtyard, Talar, Iwan, Orosi, Lion and Sun, Stucco Carving
References: [1] Asar (1980); Interviews with locals (August 2014)
HAJ22

Google code : 
35.680867, 51.425028

Description :
Address: Ghaffari, Oudlajan, District 12, Tehran
Building type:Traditional residential
State: good
Lot area: 672 sqm
Built area: 222 sqm
Floor area:(not available)
Year of construction: (not available)
Period: Qajar
Architect: (not available)
Buildings:This traditional residence consists of private quarters (andarouni) to the West which form the larger part of the complex, and smaller outer quarters (birouni) to the East. The main talar to the North of the courtyard of the private quarters has a decorative entablature. A humble door on the South-Western corner of the courtyard gives access to the alley to the South. The building has been subject to minor modifications including additional walls in the main talar, dividing the space into three small rooms. It is likely that the talar has had delicately ornamented sashed windows (not visible) as shown in the speculative reconstruction drawing. The outer quarter originally had its own entrance from the eastern alley. A hammam is located to the south of the property which may originally have been part of the property.
Exteriors: There are no traces of the original courtyard design in any of the courtyards. The exteriors are dominated by spontaneous vegetation including several large trees.
Features:andarouni, birouni, talar, hammam
documents
HAO18

Google code : 
35°40'54.74"N, 51°25'35.63"E

Description :
HAF17

Google code : 
35°40'56.19

Description :
The building had been part of a larger complex as Mirza Aqa Khan Noori edifice, later divided into several lots, each represented in the archive by a different code. Even though determining the accurate boundaries of the complex is not currently possible, it can be almost certainly said that HAI17, HAI18a, HAI18b, HAF17 (current building), HAE17 and HAH15 appertained to this complex, referred in historical documents as “townhouses of Mirza Aqa Khan”. The current building is one of the many courtyards of the complex. After Mirza Aqa Khan Noori passing away, each of his children inherited a part of the complex, and this building became the share of his first child, Mirza Kazem Khan Nezam’ol Molk. The building originally included a long rectangular woody courtyard, which the southern half of it was segregated long ago and changed into a school. The northern half had remained in its original form until early 1980’s and comprised constructions on northern and western sides. During the war between Iran and Iraq, the western side of the courtyard was completely demolished, due to missiles hitting the next construction (HAE17) and the part endured is the northern construction. The entrance situated in Imam Jome alley leads through a narrow corridor to the courtyard containing a rectangular pool. First floor consists of summer Talar, Houz khaneh, a north-south Iwan and the bathrooms. A Gooshvar is situated on either side of Houz khaneh floored with bricks like summer Talar. Houz Khane contains flooring made of blue and white tiles. The ceiling is flat and devoid of any specific adornment. Second floor comprises summer Talar, winter Talar, Iwan and private rooms. Iwan includes columns with stucco carved capitals. Its ceiling is adorned with stalactites (Moqarnas) and bricks make the flooring. Summer Talar, similar to Gooshvars in dimension, is ornamented with an integration of Moqarnas and decorative cut mirrors, flat decorative cut mirrors, stucco carvings and paintings in European style on the ceiling and walls. Two sliding Orosis connect the Talar to winter Talar and Iwan. Winter Talar includes a dais with one furnace contrived on either side of it and the ceiling and walls contain ornaments. Both Talars are floored with blue and white tiles. Private rooms flank Talars. Furthermore stone carvings, brickworks, wooden Alat-chinis and Gereh-chinis can be mentioned as adornments noticeable in the building but the most outstanding element is a nine-pane Orosi containing colored glasses separating the main Talar from Iwan.
HAI18a

Google code : 


Description :
Constructions with the codes HAI17, HAI18a, HAI18b and UAI18 were originally belonged to a same building. They are all accessed via a same entrance space (UAI18) and are all represented here under the code of HAI18a.
It is hard to determine the original boundaries of the large residence of Mirza Agha Khan Noori, which, in the course of the time, divided into many smaller parts. Certainly the above mentioned constructions were comprising the southern section of the ensemble, while HAF17 and probably HAE17 (both represented above in the index) determined its western limits and HAH15 and HAH16 (not represented in the index) were the northern buildings of the residence.
UAI18 was the southern entrance to Mirza Agha Khan's residence. It is situated at the end of a wide private forecourt. The entrance is currently largely defaced. A photo from 1980 shows the tall portal with lavish stalactite decorations (Moqarnas) flanked on the sides by two, equally tall recesses. Remains of walls on the top of the roof suggest that the entrance originally had a second story. Behind the portal an Octagonal space is situated. Its ceiling structure comprises sixteen intersected vaults. The hole structure is built out of the brick, which is also the finishing material of the inside surface. The octagon has four smaller sides, coinciding the inter cardinal directions, which gives access via vaulted doors to the different courtyards. the NE door is blocked up, but the other three are still open and lead to HAI18a (on SW) HAI17 (on NW) and HAI18b (on SE)
HAI18b is a courtyard building with construction on three sides. The main part is the northern construction which comprises a Talar (Hall) in the middle, flanked on sides by two rooms. There is an Iwan in front of the Talar, with four slender columns. From here the courtyard is accessible by two curved flights of five steps. Talar opens to Iwan by three doors. Walls of Talar are adorned with humble stucco carving designs. Two elaborately carved stucco consoles decorate the southern wall. There is a furnace on the northern wall and a door on each of east and west walls that lead to the sides rooms. Talar has later been divided into two rooms by addition of a wall on its middle. Side rooms are identical in shape and details, and are deprived of any decoration. There is a pair of windows, with a pair of elliptical openings above them, on the southern wall in each of the rooms. Western construction includes a Talar on the middle flanked by an arrangement of corridor/room/corridor spaces on each of the sides. Again two narrow Iwans with slender columns extends in front of the corridors and rooms. rooms are deprived of decorations. Talar has a beautifully decorated furnace with lavish coloured stucco carvings on its above wall.
HAI17 has a large rectangular courtyard elongated along the east-west axis. There are two buildings on the north side of the courtyard. The main building includes a Talar (Hall) extended on its front by a narrow Iwan with two slender columns. Two rooms flank Iwan and Talar on their sides. Second building has a completely similar plan, but is smaller in area. Each of the east and west sides contain a line of interconnected rooms. A corridor on the north east corner of the courtyard, as well as an opening in northern wall of Talar, connects HAI17 to HAH16, which, as mentioned before, was presumably a part of the large residence of Mirza Agha Khan.
HAV17

Google code : 
35°40'55.78"N, 51°25'44.27"E

Description :
Address: Motamen-ol-Atebba, Oudlajan, District 12, Tehran
Building type:Traditional residential
State: Ruin
Lot area: 565 sqm
Built area: 316 sqm
Floor area:(not available)
Year of construction: (not available)
Period:Early to Late Qajar
Architect: (not available)
Buildings: Belonging to early Qajar era, the building alongside with the neighboring houses (HAT16, HAU16, HAU17, and HAU18) was part of a large ensemble which formed the residence of Kiomarth Mirza Molk Ara. (32nd son of Fat’h Ali Shah Qajar) This part functioned as the outer (Birouni) quarter of the residence and was accessed from the southern part of the house, where, a front courtyard, currently adjoined to HAU16, connected the original entrance in the Qaem-Maqam ally to the Birouni and Andarouni (private) quarters. The building has constructions on three sides of the courtyard. The southern section has been built in Se-Bakshi layout: The main hall (Talar-e Tehrani) has been adorned by extensive stucco-carving and mirror works. It is flanked on its sides by two rooms in Se-Dari layout. Formerly door sized windows on the southern wall of the west side room, as well as the hall, overlooked the front courtyard. Later, they were blocked and the remains, in form of niches, are now visible on the walls. Eastern side of the building mainly encompasses servant functions. The northern section, which seems to belong to a more recent era, comprises several small rooms and a large hall on the first floor. The hall has an interesting lantern decorated on the inside by Eslimi designs. This element is unprecedented in other buildings of the era and shows European tastes influences.
exteriors: The courtyard has been paved with tiles. There is no sign of traditional persian garden layout. Hoz (pool) is situated in the center of the yard and seems to be reduced from its original size. Its likely that the original level of the courtyard was lower than the present one.
documents
HAV15

Google code : 
35°40'57.13"N, 51°25'44.13"E

Description :
HBM39

Google code : 
35°40'34.03

Description :
Address: Tin-nejad, Oudlajan, District 12, Tehran
Building type: Traditional residential
State: Ruin
Lot area: 780 sqm
Built area: 495 sqm
Floor area: (not available)
Year of construction: (not available)
Period: Mid Qajar
Architect: (not available)
Buildings: According to Abdollah Anvar, this house belonged to Mirza Abutaleb Zanjani, the wealthy Mujtahed of Naser al-Din Shah era. The remaining building is part of a larger house, which had extensions north and southward. Remains of blocked windows on the southern wall of the main courtyard, confirm this assumption. The main part of building comprises a large courtyard with constructions on three sides (north, east and west). Four smaller courtyards, with different shapes and dimensions surround this part. Through a small courtyard on the north-west corner of the main-courtyard a long corridor (about 20 meters in length) becomes accessible which connects the house to the alley. Right after the entrance and alongside the long corridor a small courtyard is situated, with an adjoining building on its north side that comprises a room, an Iwan and a little basement. The most important and lavish space of the house is the large hall (Talar) of the main courtyard. It has a double-floor height and overlooks on three sides (south, east and west) to three courtyards through five large sashed windows. “Hozkhaneh” or inside pool is situated under Talar and has almost the same plan, but with a shorter ceiling height. It is accessed through a small courtyard on the north-east corner of the building. The tile fragments found in this room, show that the plinth was decorated with relief tiles depicting floral designs or imaginary scenes from European cities. Originally the house had lavish stained glass windows embellished with floral traces painted on the glass pieces (Landani -Sazi). The Iwan, in front of the main Talar, had tall wood columns placed on elaborately-curved stone basis, and finished with stucco carving on the surface. The exterior plinths had Haft-Rangi tile works displaying floral and figural designs.
Exteriors: The main courtyard had a rectangular large Hooz in front the Iwan. There is an octagonal Hooz in south east courtyard, and small square one in the north east courtyard. large Ailanthus and Fig trees dominate all open spaces.
Features: Andarouni, Birouni, Talar, Hozkhaneh, Narenjestan, Relief Tiles
documents
HAL16

Google code : 


Description :
The house belongs to mid-Qajar era and is visible in the elevated views of Tehran shot in 1870s. The house is clearly distinguished in these photographs due to its tall wind catcher and large pediment. The name of the house first appears in Abdol-Ghaffar map where it is attributed to Mirza Zaki Khan, probably a relative of Mirza Agha Khan Noori. It was lately owned by Colonel Khajavi, a military commander in Reza Shah Army.[1] In the recent years it has been the location of many Iranian films, including the 2004 award winning film Mum's Guest.
The house is said to have a larger boundary originally which, in the course of the time, became smaller as the northern (HAM15) and eastern (HAN16a) parts divided into separate lots. HAN16a originally being the stable and carriage house, later turned into a Zurkhaneh (traditional gymnasium) which its name, Borzuyeh, became the name of the alley as well. [2] The remaining building (HAL15) now constitutes three courtyards and few other sections such as entrance, kitchen (Matbakh) and servants' ward.
Main court is situated in the southern part of the house and has a large size. The second courtyard, probably used as the outer section (Birouni) of the house is situated on the east and is half of the size of the main courtyard. Third courtyard is located behind the main courtyard and to the west of the second one, and is half of the latter in size. This courtyard can be regarded as an intermediate section between the two previously mentioned courtyards.[3]
The entrance in Borzuyeh alley is a doorway flanked on sides by a pair of columns that hold a heavy cornic on their top. A strip of decorative stucco leaves moves around the arched doorway. The entrance opens to a square hall with flat ceiling that leads through its western side (facing to entrance) to a rectangular corridor which in turn gives access to the second courtyard. On the southern side of the entrance a door leads to a beautiful Hashti (Octagonal hall) covered by dome ceiling and then on the left side of the Hashti to a long vaulted corridor. Along the corridor, proceeding from Hashti to main courtyard, there are two doors on the southern wall, open respectively to the second courtyard and to a large room with a stair case on its corner that provides access to the roof. There are buildings on each side of the main courtyard. The most important one is located on the north. It is laid out in three sectional plan (Se-Bakhshi) with a wide double-floor height Iwan in the middle and, in each story, two rooms on the verge. The Iwan initially had had a T-shape plan which changed into a rectangle after dividing the northern part as a separate room. Iwan is adorned with lavish stucco carving decorations on walls and recesses. Its original false ceiling, which probably had had exquisite decoration and paintings, was removed later and now the wooden beam structure is visible. Also the large pediment atop of the Iwan, visible in 1860s elevated photos as well as the aerial photo of 1956 was eliminated later. A pair of cylindrical columns with corinthian capitals sustain the wide bay of Iwan. All other rooms are also adorned by stucco carving decorations. While the stucco carvings on the Iwan are projected more than normal, rooms’ decorations are flat and in this regard more similar to stone reliefs.[4]
There is a set of nested interconnected rooms and corridors behind the Iwan that comprises the buildings of the third courtyard. On the North West corner of the courtyard remains of the large duct of the wind catcher, which in its pristine condition is estimated to be 14 meters in height, is endured. The second courtyard is adorned by delicate decorative stalactites (Moqarnas) on the diagonal corners of the courtyard. Basement is accessible by few steps from the main courtyard. Here the focal space is a large cellar located below the Iwan. It is also connected to the wind catcher by an underground tunnel. [5]
References:
[1] Atefeh Baseri, interview: summer 2016
[2] Mir Mehdi Tehrani, interview: summer 2015
[3], [4], [5] Parvande-ye Sabti Khaneh-ye Sarhang Iradj, Cultural Heritage of Iran, 2005.
HAP15

Google code : 
35°40'57.11

Description :
According to oral memories of the locals, this building was part of a larger house originally belonged to Agha Bahram the Georgian enouch of Fat’h Ali Shah court and was later owned by Major General Ebrahim Zarrabi during Pahlavi era. This building served as the Birouni (outer) section of the house, while the west neighbouring building, demolished in 2013, was Andarouni (inner) section. The building encompasses a T-shaped main hall, with a double floor height ceiling, a rear space, probably used as storage and entrance corridors on sides of the hall. Main Hall is the most lavishly-decorated part of the house. Two rows of recesses built in two different levels, goes around the walls. There are five recesses on the northern wall of the hall, three on the east side and a same number was on the west wall, which was demolished during the constructions of the neighbouring lot. The southern side of room included a tall three panel sashed window, which has been removed in the past years, and two doorways on its side that led to the entrance corridors and are now blocked up with brick. Upper niches are adorned with a same decorative stucco carving pattern that depicts, on the lower section, a vase, seemingly made out of flowers, surrounded by birds and floral motifs, a curved frame surrounding picture of a raptor hunting another bird, on the middle, and eventually two mythical creatures flanking a rectangular frame on the upper section. The Spandrels are also adorned with floral traces that encircle a star-shaped mirror work on each side. Beneath each of the upper niches, on the junction of upper and lower rows, there is a narrow frame of stucco carving, displaying two patterns, that are mother and baby, and a bird feeding its chicks, which are repeated respectively all around the room. The junction of each trace with the next one is articulated by a star shaped mirror work. The niches of the lower level are adorned with decorative stalactites (Moqarnas) on their top. Above each of the recess, a rectangular frame is formed that encompasses a set of floral traces and an oval-shaped frame of mirror work.
documents
HAO13

Google code : 
35°40'59.51"N, 51°25'35.53"E

Description :
HAM12

Google code : 
35°41'0.78

Description :
This house belongs to early to mid Qajar period. During 1990s it under went to heavy renovations to be repurposed as a community center and due to inappropriate interventions lost many of its original elements. The building is lied out in traditional courtyard plan with buildings on three side, i. e. north, south and west, the west wing being the most important one that accommodates main hall (Talar) Later (circa 1980s) north wing was demolished and an additional part built on the eastern part of the courtyard. Nowadays the only remaining part that shows traces of the Qajar period is the lavished Talar, its basement and two wind catchers. Courtyard is sunken 2.6 meters below the grade level and is accessible through a newly built flight of stairs on the northern part of the lot that ascends to the entrance on the Kamali alley. The only intact part of the house is situated at the middle of the eastern wing. Here, the main element on the facade is a large wooden Orosi window, with seven panels. The whole facade is finished with bricks, that seems to be of a newer type when compared to those used for the outside finishing of wind catchers' ducts. Above the Orosi the plain pattern of bricks changes for a more complicated and decorative one with protruding bricks in certain courses. The roof to this part was formerly a large pediment that later changer with a pitched roof. The T-shaped Talar (Talar Tehrani) show cases a variety of decorative arts, including stucco carving, oil painting, wood painting, Moqanas, mirror works and reverse painting on mirror. Talar is double floor height. Its longest side accommodates the large Orosi window. The smaller sides are divided into two vertical and three horizontal sections, resultantly each side comprises six section of an equal size. The central section of the below row, on both sides, is the entrance door. The door itself is delicately decorated with floral designs and landscape paintings. The other two sections of the lower row include a painted plinth and square shape recesses. Recesses are adorned with Moqarnas, mirror work and reverse painting on mirror. Upper row includes three tall arched recesses which are graced with mirror works and delicate stucco carvings painted by oil color. On the center of the western side, the indented part of the hall is situated. It is vaulted with complicated decorative stalactites (Moqarnas) and finished with a mixture of mirror works and stucco carving attached on mirrors. Basement is built between the extents of the Talar and has a cruciform plan (Shekam Darideh) The plinth is finished with painted tiles (Kashi Haft Rangi) depicting scenes from the mythical tales. Ceiling is finished with beautiful patterns of colored bricks.
HAM09

Google code : 
35°41'3.80"N, 51°25'33.89"E

Description :
HAQ15

Google code : 
35°40'57.45

Description :
Buildings
This house comprises outer (Birouni) and inner (Andarouni) sections built on a rectangular lot, and belongs to mid Qajar period. Outer section is situated to the east and has a greater area compared to the inner section which is situated to the west of the building. Two entrances give access to the building. The main entrance opens directly to Sadr-e Azam Noori alley and provides access for both the inner and the outer part. The secondary entrance on the east side of the building opens to Vosough dead end and exclusively pertains to outer part.
After passing through the main entrance, corridors extend into two different directions. On the right hand a corridor led to the outer courtyard, but it has been blocked up recently. On the left hand, the other corridor reaches the inner courtyard, after turning to the south. Along this corridor a small rectangular room is situated. The inner courtyard is a narrow rectangle extending along the north-south direction with beveled sides at its corners that give it a pseudo octagonal appearance. On the northern side of the outer courtyard a rather large Seh Dari is situated. It is accessible through a small square hall that opens to the north east corner of the courtyard. It is connected on the north side to a corridor beside the She Dari room and to the east to another corridor that opens to the outer courtyard.
The outer courtyard has construction on three sides. Northern wing formerly accommodated an Iwan, a Hall (Talar) behind that and two rooms flanking the Iwan and the Talar. Today the Iwan, Talar and the western flanking room has been all merged to each other and dividing walls eliminated. The eastern flanking room has still preserved its original appearance, including recesses and simple stucco carvings. Western wing includes a large Seh Dari room with two corridors on its sides, the northern one, as described before, being the connecting corridor of the inner and outer courtyards and the southern being the blocked one that starts from entrance. Exactly the same arrangement has been used for the eastern wing. Here the southern corridor connects to the secondary entrance and the northern one turns to the north and eventually through a flight of stairs gives access to the roof.
All the constructions have basements. The basements under northern wing both in the inner and outer courtyards are large rooms almost equal in size and shape to the rooms above them in the first floor, and were used during summer as living rooms. Kitchen was situated under the southern wing of the inner courtyard. Ab Anbar (water reservoir) is in the western wing beneath the She Dari room.
All the basements have beautiful brick work patterns on their ceilings. Some of the original doors and windows of the building (including the entrance doors) have been replaced with new ones. Fortunately many of the original wooden doors inside the building have endured. The original façade is now hidden under a layer of cement, but it was likely adorned with a mixture of brick and tile works (Kashi Moaqali)
Outdoors
Formerly Qanat-e Pamenar watered the building. It passed through the courtyard and supplied its large elliptical Howz and then followed its way to the alley. Another aqueduct stemmed from the Howz, connected to the water reservoir and opened periodically to fill the reservoir.
HAS11

Google code : 
35°41'2.66

Description :
Buildings:
The construction of the building probably dates back to the early reign of Naser Al’din Shah. Early on, the building had been in possession of Mirza Shafee Saheb divan Ashtiyani. In the early 1860’s it was bought by Mirza Saeed Khan motamen ol’molk Ansari, then minister of foreign affairs. The building have been part of a larger complex, which some of its sections have still remained and are represented in the archive by different codes.
The layout of the house consists of three interconnected courtyards. The main courtyard is situated on the median of the north-south line that all three courtyards are organized along. The main entrance is situated at the north-western corner. It is connected to a pentagon-like vestibule, which through a short corridor next to the entrance, leads to a division space and then to Talars and main courtyard. The entrance’s plan is a unique paradigm, which can’t be seen in any other building. The northern side of the house comprises three interconnected spaces. The middle space is Mirrors Talar and the space behind it is Sofreh Khane (dining) Talar. A room with nearly square dimensions is situated on the western side of each Talar. On the western side a long corridor spans the width of Sofreh Khaneh and Mirror Hall, connecting the northern courtyard to the main courtyard. The northern courtyard has a rectangular shape with small dimensions and chamfered edges. The widows of Sofreh Khaneh Talar open to this secondary courtyard. Furthermore two other entrances to the building are situated on northern side and north-west corner of it. The eastern part of the courtyard comprises a sedari room and the bathroom, the western part includes the stairs to the rooftop and the guardroom. The surfsces are decorated with different patterns of brickwork. In the past a large pediment was placed above the Mirrors Talar. Large and exquisite Sash windows (Orosi) of Talar, recognizable in 1980 photos, have been detached later. An alignment of interconnected rooms is situated in the eastern part of the main courtyard, which are devoid of any specific adornments. In some rooms mantelpieces including fine stucco carvings can be seen. The rooms are roofed over with dropped wooden Qaab bandi. Another set of stairs in the south-western corner of the courtyard leads to the rooftop. Between the main and southern courtyard stands a two-story building, which is severely damaged and identifying its spaces is not possible. On the whole it can be said, that this construction also had had a three-section paradigm and the central space with a double height ceiling as its main space, which, according to the old aerial photos, had a small pediment on the top. Constructions on the western and southern sides of the southern courtyard were allocated for services, like kitchen and storeroom.
The basement of northern construction in the northern courtyard consists of an underground cistern, a cellar and Hoz Khaneh. The plinths in Hoz Khaneh had been made of elegant Haft-rangi tiles which were stolen through time. The underground cistern had been filled long ago.
Courtyard:
The courtyards are floored with large square bricks. There are two rectangular flower beds in front of the northern construction in the main courtyard and a small rectangular pool with a stone framework is situated in front of the southern construction. The current vegetation consists of weeds and no sign of the former vegetation and old trees is recognizable.
documents
HAT15

Google code : 
35°40'57.67"N, 51°25'42.55"E

Description :
HAO19a

Google code : 
35°40'54.03, 51°25'35.63

Description :
Buildings: There is no information about the historical background of the house. The house has two distinct period of construction: the northern and western sides are built during early Qajar period, and the southern part pertains to late Qajar era, as it is evident from the form the vaults and general proportions. The earlier building had its entrance on the south-west corner of the house that through a vaulted doorway led to a small Hashti which in turn, by a narrow diagonal corridor, gave access to the courtyard. This diagonal placement has let the cistern’s staircase to be built in the thickness of corridor’s rear wall. After the construction of late Qajar section, the original entrance was blocked. Instead of that a new entrance has been opened right after the old one which by few steps connects the alley to a square entrance space deprived of any spectacular feature. This space alongside to a long rectangular room to its eastern side comprises the late Qajar extension. Next to entrance apparatus (i. e. corridor, Hashti, Cistern staircase) there is a long five-door room (Panj Dari) which has been later divided into two inter connected rooms and alongside to it, are two doorways that reflected corridor and cistern’s staircase entrances on the other side of the façade. The first doorway leads to the Mahtabi (rooftop terrace) and second floor rooms. The second doorway opens to a short corridor which gives access on its north wall to the kitchen, and at its western end to a double door which opens to a very small den. It is possible that the den was originally an entrance to a currently blocked basement, or gave access to another courtyard that has been later divided and demolished. The northern section is comprised of three interconnected room. Each of the side rooms has a portico on its front. Rooms are opened the portico via three doorways, each has a stained-glass window on the above. Inside of the rooms are adorned with two rows of recesses, one situated above the other. Upper row recesses have pointed vaults while the vaults of those situated on the below row are flat. A chain of minimal stucco-carved stalactites (Qatar-e Moqarnas) lines around the room between upper and below rows. We couldn’t enter the middle room. A basement room is situated beneath the middle room and is accessible through few steps from the courtyard. The room has brick walls and brick vaulted ceiling that displays various patterns made by varying placement of bricks in angle and arrangement. The basement room is connected to an interesting small cellar completely carved through the soil without any supporting structure. Second floor is mainly comprised of two rooms, one above the Hashti, with delicate stucco-carved stalactites and a beautiful fireplace, and the other one above the kitchen, which is deprived of ornaments. A rooftop terrace (Mahtabi) is situated between these rooms, connecting them to each other.
documents
HAW19

Google code : 
35°40'53.92, 51°25'45.20

Description :
The buildings represented in the archive by the codes HAW19, HAW18, HAW17, UAV19, HAV18b and HAV18a, all appertaining to a large house, are classified in the index as a subset of the code HAW19. The house is illustrated in Krziz map, which according to it was owned by Mirza Sadeq Khan Amin od-Dowleh Qaem maqam. Furthermore the alley, in which the main entrance of the complex is situated, is named Qaem maqam.
UAV19 is the main entrance of the complex situated in the end of Qaem maqam access. The entrance consists of a forecourt, vestibule, and passageway. The ceilings of the forecourt and the vestibule are ornamented with Karbandi (intersecting arcs). A door in the north face of vestibule opens to the public quarter (Birouni) (HAV18b). The east face is connected to a short passage, in the end of which the entrance of private quarters (Andarouni) (HAW18, HAW19) is situated. Later the entrance got closed and by demolishing a wall of the passage, a new entrance was formed.
HAV18b is the public quarter (birouni) of the house and in the past had comprised buildings in both northern and southern fronts, which a major part of the southern construction is demolished and except a few shelves on one of its walls nothing is remained. Although the northern construction has endured, it is severely damaged. This section is constructed in two storeys. The ground floor is a five- span Talar and has fairly large dimensions. Remnants of stucco carvings can be seen on the walls of this section. The basement consists of a room in the middle and two corridors on either side of it, which one of them according to the residents had been used as kitchen. The room is roofed over with flat arc ceiling. In the past an Iwan including two columns and three spans was situated in the front of the Talar.
HAW18 and HAW19: These two sections comprised a courtyard and constructions in four fronts that later was segregated into two parts. The most significant section of the building is the northern construction, including a large T-shape Talar in the middle of it. The adornments of Talar consist of stucco carvings in the upper portion of the shelves representing patterns of mythological birds, stalactites and stucco carvings with herbal patterns. The Talar is constructed in two storeys. Two corridors are situated on either side of it, which are replaced by two lateral rooms in the first floor. The rooms had had openings to Talar, now closed. The east room includes a small space and slight adornments, however the west room has large dimensions and a high ceiling, resembling it to another Talar. Ornate stucco carvings and sumptuous stalactites can be seen on the walls and shelves of the room. The ceiling has dilapidated many years ago, therefore nothing can be stated about the structure and adornments. The north construction comprises a large basement which its access is obstructed. Each of the constructions in the east and west side of the courtyard consist of three rooms and a corridor between them. In both sections, the middle room had been roofed with timber beams. The ceiling of the lateral rooms is arched. The outer covering is a structural roof, executed with timber beams, and the inner layer – a suspended ceiling – executed with brick, is very light. The south construction similarly has three rooms, with same ceiling and roof structure: the middle one flat and the laterals arched.
HAW17: This section is situated in the north of the Androuni and Birouni quarters and formerly was a large garden, destroyed in 2004, is currently a barren land. The rooms of the Andarouni quarter open to the Andarouni courtyard in the south and face the garden in the north. In the old aerial photos, a large square pool can be seen in the middle of the garden. Two buildings had been existed in the south east and south west corners. The south west building had been constructed in two stories, in which the ground floor was a Hoz Khaneh, and the rooms in the first floor were adjacent to the garden and the backyard (HAV18a).
HAV18a: According to the dimensions and the location of the building, situated in one of the corners of the complex, it can be considered as a backyard. It is the most recent section of the house. According to the form of the building and the adornments, the construction dates back to mid Qajar era. The building includes a separate entrance, which leads to its courtyard through a short narrow corridor in L shape. The courtyard is small and with dimensions close to a square, enclosed by two-story buildings in three faces of north, east and south. The spandrel of the arcs is adorned with elegant Haft-Rangi tiles (underglaze-painted tiles). Ornate stucco carved fireplaces can be seen in the first floor rooms. Due to the walls devoid of any adornments, it is most likely that they were covered with wallpapers.
Key words: garden, backyard, Haft-rangi tiles, Tehrani Talar, stucco carvings, wallpaper
documents (UAV19)
documents (HAW17)
documents (HAW18)
documents (HAV18a)
HBL12

Google code : 
35°41'0.59"N, 51°26'3.90"E

Description :
HAX19

Google code : 
35°40'53.16"N, 51°25'46.98"E

Description :
HAW20

Google code : 
35°40'52.50

Description :
This house shows a very complete version and well-preserved example of the early Qajar style houses. Almost no major change of addition of a later age is noticeable and the historical mold of building has been remained rather intact.
The house is consisting of a large courtyard and buildings on its four sides. The original entrance on the north east corner of the house was blocked later, but the brick work around the former door is still visible. This entrance probably reached the courtyard through an L shaped corridor with its other end appearing somewhere in the east wing of the courtyard. The current entrance has been opened up, just next to the older one, in the northern wall of one corridor of a pair in the north construction of the courtyard. Through the wide and straight corridor it leads directly to the courtyard and lacks the usual turn the traditional entrance systems that concealed the inner courtyard from the vision of people passing outside.
The southern wing of the courtyard is the most lavish part of the house. It has been laid out in three-section layout (She-Bakhshi) with a large rectangular hall at the middle flanked by two wide corridors on the sides. The corridors elevated from the courtyard level and accessible through four steps. The height of each step was formed out of perforated tile work that functioned as lighting apparatus for the basement below. An adjacent room was on the southern end of each corridor. An exquisite seven-panel wooden window with very intricate geometrical patterns executed without using nails is the master piece of the house. Since the main hall has a double floor height side rooms has a second floor which is accessible through two flights of steps on the western most part of the wing (accessible through the western flanking corridor)
The west side is consisting three rooms and four intervening corridors between them. The largest room, a Panj Dari, is situated at the middle and is flanked firstly by a pair of corridors and secondly by a pair of smaller Seh Dari rooms. The third corridor, on the side of the northern Seh Dari, gived access to the kitchen, an isolated space with a vaulted ceiling that extends all along the depth of northern construction. A forth corridor, adjacent to the south of southern Seh Dari completes this pseudo-symmetrical system and gives access to a flight a stair that leads to the basement under the south wing, This basement served as a summer living room and has a high ceiling adorned with different patterns of brick work.
The north construction, briefly described before, is consisted of a main cruciform hall (Talar Shekam-Darideh) at the middle and two flanking corridors on the sides, one leading to the entrance and the other to a long rectangular room. The cruciform hall has a Pastoo attached to its northern side.
As mentioned before no major changes are visible in the building, expect for removal of a few of the original wooden windows and removal of the large pediment above the main hall, which is visible in the aerial photos of 1956.
KAX31

Google code : 
35°40'41.86"N, 51°25'47.14"E

Description :
HBQ29

Google code : 
35°40'43.77

Description :
According to Map of Abdol-Ghaffar and Kraziz this house belonged to Hosseingholi Khan Qajar Sepanloo. The building was originally situated in a large garden that extended westward to Pesteh-Beg Garden and southward to HBP31 and HBP30 (see below). After many inheritances the garden was divided into several lots, leaving only the northern building intact, which, for years, was in the possession of Ghorabi family. After the Islamic revolution the owners moved abroad and the building was abandoned ever since.
The building is mid to late Qajar era. The northern part is laid out in the three-sectional scheme (Se-Bakshi) which comprises a large hall on the middle and two rooms on the verge. The modular system (Peymoon) of plan constitutes substantial division of 120 cm as the smallest building block. Therefore, all of the doors and windows are at least 120 cm in width. Main hall is decorated by a lavish furnace framed in stucco carving decorations and by baeutiful vintage wall papers. Side rooms are decorated with the same elements and materials. There is no sign of later alternation inside the building, except for a thick wall that divides a part of Talar as a corridor. Basement has a trisection plan similar to that of the first floor. A cruciform Room (Howzkhaneh), right below the main hall, with a vaulted brick roof, comprises the main part of the basement. Adornments of Howzkhnahe are mainly brick work patterns. The room is flanked on sides by two smaller rectangular rooms, similarly adorned on walls and ceiling with brick work patterns. On the first floor, a large Iwan (porch) extends all along the southern facade. The original columns of the Iwan, which are counted four on the aerial photo of 1956, were later replaced with a pair of metal columns.
The large scale of Hall and rooms has resulted to larger bays which at the time were impossible to cover with flat roof, therefore pitched roof has been used instead.

documents
HBP31

Google code : 
35°40'42.30

Description :
Buildings: This building belongs to mid-Qajar era, and most likely, alongside with the neighboring building (HBP30) comprised a larger house with Birooni (inner) and Andarouni (outer) sections.
The entrance on the south-west corner of the lot gives access to a square hall. Here on the front side a narrow flight of stairs reaches to the roof-top terrace (Mahtabi). Beside the stair case, another passage, through some steps, leads to the courtyard. Still another door, on the east side of the hall opens to a set of interconnected rooms which comprise the southern part of the courtyard which has constructions on its northern and western parts as well. The northern construction includes a T-shaped Talar on the middle and corridors on the verge. Talar originally had two windcathcher which were demolished later, but the vent ducts have stayed in their original form. They each open to one of the pair pantries on the sides of Talar.
Western part comprises a corridor in the center and two small rooms on its sides. There is an isolated room, probably used as a kitchen, on the north-west corner of the building. Its width and length equals respectively those of western and northern construction and opens to both of the mentioned wards, merging them into an interconnected system of rooms and junctures.
The second floor is mainly comprised of a roof top terrace and two facing rooms on each ends of the terrace. The room on the north is bigger and situated above the corner room (kitchen). The southern room is of an equal size to the entrance apparatus below. The room overlooks the alley as well as the terrace.
While the internal spaces are plane, the façade has been adorned by a playful use of colorful brick patterns and brick carving decorations. Cylindrical pilasters divide the façade, while a set of well-proportioned arches help the articulations further. Capitals and bases are carved out of brick and show abstracted herbal patterns. The original stained glass windows have been removed. Some remnants of stained glass decorations are still visible at semicircular panels above the interior doors.
Courtyard: there is a stone carved pool (Howz) in the northern half of the courtyard, right in front of the Talar, while two flower beds occupies the southern half. A large old Platanus tree appears to be the only evidence of the original vegetation of the courtyard.
documents
BBR25

Google code : 
35°40'47.41

Description :
Construction of the bathhouse, accomplished by financial support of two women of Navvab Tehrani family, dates back to early Qajar era. It is constructed at a depth of 3 meters. The entrance reaches an octagonal space through a corridor consisting eight stairs and in the opposite face connects to an oblique stairway, which leads to Garmkhaneh through 14 steps. The Garmakhaneh space is in an irregular octagonal shape, with four of its sides, in the line with the main directions, larger than the other four sides. Four banquettes are situated in southern, eastern and western sides of Garmkhaneh. The northern face is connected to another octagonal space, which through a joint leads to the heated pool (Khazineh). The south-western face of Khazineh leads to the hexagonal space of Mian darb, through a short corridor. Counter to the short corridor, the entrance to the service spaces is situated, which is a small room in the shape of a long rectangle including an arched ceiling. Contiguous to this face, a long oblique corridor returns to Khazineh. Khazineh, resembling to Garmkhane, has an octagonal plan with four sides larger than the others. The smaller sides in north- and south-eastern directions are the entrances to the private bathing areas. Eastern face leads to the large space of Chal Houz, comprising a large rectangular pool situated in the center. The pool had been filled with cold water in the past. In the north-eastern corner of the construction, behind the private bathing areas, two interconnected spaces can be seen, which were used for service.
The adornments of the building are limited to brickworks on the ceilings, which are brought out from under a layer of cement through recent restorations. The ceilings indicate different types of arched covers. The ceilings of Garmkhaneh and Khazineh (heated pool) are adorned with Karbandi (intersecting arcs), that has been executed in the first space using a far more intricate paradigm than the second.
BAR20

Google code : 
35°40'53.02

Description :
According to the handwritten mortmain deed, the construction of the bathhouse dates back to pre-Naser Al’din Shah era. Its former name had been Vakil bathhouse, which takes the construction date further back to Zandieh era, since some of the buildings constructed by Karim Khan Zand are renowned as Vakil. In the late 1840’s, the bathhouse had been in possession of Khan Baba Khan Sardar Iravani, yet henceforth at Naser Al’din Shah’s behest was bought and endowed to the public.
The entrance is situated in Pamenar Street. A set of narrow stairs connect the entrance to a vestiary at a depth of 5 meters. At the southern face of it there are stairs which lead to the rooftop. On the south-eastern side, a corridor leads to Mian darb and then the heated pool (Khazineh). The roof having a slight incline, reaches Amirsediqi alley.
The adornments of the building comprise Moaqeli (a combination of bricks and tiles) and Haft-rangi tiles, currently covered with a layer of cement. However the remains of Haft-rangi tiles can still be seen in the flooring. Apart from adding a few dressing rooms to the vestiary, no major alteration can be recognized.
documents
HAK26

Google code : 
35°40'47.55

Description :
Address: Rahimi, Oudlajan, District 12, Tehran Building type: Traditional residential State: ruin Lot area: 662 sqm Built area: 265 sqm Floor area: (not available) Year of construction: (not available) Period: Early Qajar Architect: (not available) Buildings: According to Abdol-Ghaffar Map this building was part of Farajollah Khan House, of whom no biographical information has been found yet. Elements such as pointed arches, decorative stalactites rows on the junction of wall and ceiling and three-sectional plan layout, date the building back to the early 19th century.
The house is laid out in two connected courtyards with a total area of 662 square meters. Both courtyards are elongated along a south-north axis. The first courtyard is situated on the eastern side of the lot, comprising three rooms and a closet (Pastoo), all with a ceiling height of 4 meters. Two rows of pointed arched recess, one built above the other, line around the walls. Some of the recess have been filled with brick later.
The second courtyard has buildings on three sides. The main building is erected in three levels, on the west side of the courtyard, comprising a cruciform hall (Talar-e Shekam Darideh) as its main space, and three other smaller rooms on the sides. Interior walls and ceiling of the hall is decorated with finely executed stucco carvings. Some parts showcased mirror works as well, now covered up under a layer of plaster. A lavish line of stalactites (Qatar-e Moqarnas) goes around the room on the junction of wall and ceiling. The three-panel sashed window of the Talar has been damaged severely and only the main frame has survived. Each of the side rooms display some decorations in recesses, wall and ceiling junction, and fireplaces.
Basement floor plan is almost the same of the ground floor. The ceilings, which are flat brick arches, display various patterns made by varying placement of bricks in angle and arrangement. Here the main space is likewise cruciform and nested brick works, in recess and openings, allows the space to be visualy connected to the side rooms.
The construction of the east side is a very narrow building that probably encompassed servant room, toilet and kitchen. The north side construction, as well, was probably of a lower importance and comprised a room with two corridors on its sides.
Courtyards: traces of brick pavement is observed in first courtyard. In the second courtyard an octagonal pool (Howz) is situated on the middle and is flanked by two square garden beds on the sides. Vegetation includes Pomegranate, Fig and Ailanthus trees.
Keywords: Nested brickwork, Stucco Carving, Mirror Work, Cruciform Hall
documents
HBM15

Google code : 
35°40'57.13

Description :
Buildings: The building was part of a bigger house that originally extended westward to Mirza Mahmoud Vazir Alley and southward to Haj Fakhr-ol-Molk alley, and later chopped into six smaller lots, of which only HBL15 and HBM15 remained in their original state [1]. It’s not apparent whether Sarhang Movasaghi house (HBM14a) on the north side of this house was part of the original building, nevertheless the extension of HBM14a lot’s outlines aligned to those of HBM15, suggests this possibility. There are two sources that give an account of the building’s history. According to Kraziz map the ensemble was originally belonged to Reza Gholi Khan Ardalan, governor of Kurdestan, who had been exiled to Tehran by Mohammad Shah Qajar (r. 1834-1848). Eyn-ol-Saltaneh Saloor, brother in law of Reza Gholi Khan’s son, Fakhr-ol-Molk Ardalan (1864-1927), mentions Prince Nayeb-ol-Iyaleh as the original owner of the house. According to him, the house was later inherited to Nayeb-ol-Iyaleh’s son, prince Mohammad Hassan Mirza who sold the outer section (HBM15) to his brother in law, Fakhr-ol-Molk [2].
Building has construction on northern and western sides. Northern construction comprises a narrow portico, adorned with stucco carvings and decorative cut mirrors on its ceiling. The protruding adornments are executed in star, circle, and oval shapes and include herbal patterns. The portico is connected to a short corridor, which leads to the main staircase, having a storeroom situated on either side of it. An alcove, ornamented with decorative cut mirrors and colored stucco carvings is situated in the landing. There are also crude paintings on the walls. A skylight let natural light into the space. Two Barvars at the ends of the corridor were used as the bedrooms of the residents and two Gooshvars situated above them were used as the guestrooms, either of which has an iwan in front of it. A fireplace is installed in the corner of each room. A three-span Talar is situated in between and connected to them, decorated with stucco carvings and windows including colored glasses recently detached. The room also comprises a fireplace-like painting combined with stucco carving. The western Gooshvar leads through few steps to a room with similar dimensions in the western construction. There is a small joint between the room and the main hall. The main hall, with large dimensions, includes a dais and an exquisite fireplace executed in the western wall. A roofed Iwan is situated in front of it, which is connected to the courtyard through few steps. Beneath the main hall, few steps lead to the cruciform Hoz Khaneh. Later by chopping one of the four wings, a bathroom was added to the space. An underground cistern is connected to Hoz Khaneh, which was filled after tap water became customary. Next door there is a store room next to it is situated the kitchen, which has a large oven on its western face and is contiguous with the western Barvar.
Courtyard: A narrow entrance corridor leads through few steps to a fairly large courtyard. A rectangular pool is situated in front of the portico. The vegetation of the courtyard consists of a few trees and weed bushes.
References: [1] interview with Mr. Zoroufchi, winter 2016
[2] Eyn-os-Saltaneh Saloor, Memoirs, Tehran: 1996. p. 660
documents
BAJ22

Google code : 
35°40'50.61

Description :
This small bath belongs to early Qajar era, and was probably a part of the neighbouring house, HAJ22. Dimensions of the building, which are rather minute for a public bath, may suggests that it was primarily used as a private bath by the owner, and was open to public at other times. Floor level is 3.25 meters below the grade level, and is accessible from entrance through two successive narrow flights of steps. Right after the stairs, is situated Sarbineh (changing room). The space is rectangular in plan, with two pairs of stone columns in the middle. Nine pointed arches vaults between columns and columns and columns and walls, thus making a grid of nine unequal squares and rectangles. The main section of the grid is covered by a dome, with circular base section, that has a lantern on the top. From the south-eastern corner of this room, a doorway opens to a long pseudo rectangular Miandarb, which acts as an intermediate room between dry and humid sections. A doorway on the southern end of this space gives access to a smaller room that was used for shaving. Fronting to this side, another door opens at the other end of Miandarb to Garmabeh section, which was used for washing and had a public pool on its centre (blocked up later) and three more private spaces on the corners. Garmabeh has an octagonal plan with four of the sides longer than the other four. The shorter sides are used as entrances to the secondary spaces, while longer sides are constructed in form of deep niches with raised floor, which made it appropriate for receiving massage, relaxing and smoking hookah. Ceiling structure is a simple type of intersecting arches (Karbandi) and is now buried under heavy layers of cement; Thus its form and elements are hard to be recognized. A lantern on the top of the ceiling lets natural light in.
In the recent decades building has gone under some changes and alternations including blocking up the pools and adding cabins and showers, covering the original interior surface with cement and tiling walls up to a height of 1.5 meters from the floor level.
documents
MAM31

Google code : 


Description :
Buildings:
The mosque was built at Mohammad Shah’s behest in late 1830’s for Aqa Mahmoud Behbahani (circa 1200-1853), the grandson of Vahid Behbahani, renowned Shiite religious figure of 18th century. Al-e Aqa family, the grandchildren of Aqa Mahmoud, had been in charge of the superintendence of the mosque for years.
The mosque opens through two entrance doors on the southern face to Haajiha alley, located in the direction of Marvi market. Each one of the doors connects to the courtyard through two passageways and a vestibule. Presumably one of the entrances pertained to women and the other one to men. A set of stairs is situated right next to the western entrance, leading to a deep underground cistern, which is currently abandoned. The passageways are contrived on eastern and western sides of Gonbadkhaneh. A small courtyard is situated on the eastern side of the mosque and is linked to the main courtyard through the eastern passageway and was used for performing ablutions. Thus a staircase situated in the western passageway leads to the rooftop. Three interconnected rooms containing large wooden windows are situated on the northern side with entrances on either side of the courtyard. The mosque comprises a fairly large courtyard, which includes symmetrical cells on eastern and western sides. The shabestan of the mosque, with dimensions of nine in ten meters, is roofed with a large dome. The outstanding features of the building comprise complex Karbandis (intersected vaults) meticulously executed with brick finishing, as the ceiling of the gateways and Iwans. Recesses and framings on the interior and exterior walls of the mosque contain elegant panels of Haft-rangi tiles. The dominant colors of the tiles are blue and yellow, which resemble the tiling style in Safavi era. Two square frames of tiles are recently added on either side of the main Iwan, which are completely different from the original sections of the building. The elements of karbandi like Toranji and Kashkouli are adorned with solitaires of Moaqeli tiles. The inner surface of the dome is plain white. The walls of Gonbadkhaneh contain two rows of recesses. The rows are of a same height. The upper shelves, which are in fact squinches are plain as the inner surface of the dome and the lower ones are ornamented with Haft-rangi tiles.
Currently the whole area of the main courtyard is roofed, which not only distorts the original character of the courtyard as an open social space, but has also obscured the entire dome and part of the main iwan.
Courtyard:
Nearly all the signs of the primary elements of the courtyard, such as pool and vegetation have been eliminated at the time of constructing the roof.
HAW38

Google code : 


Description :
Buildings: According to Abd ol’qafar map, the house had been once owned by “Haj Reza Khan”, whom of his identity there’s no accurate information. It is more likely that he was “Haj Reza Khan Davalou”, father of Asef ol’saltaneh. The current building had distinctly been a part of a larger complex, which its area can’t be determined according to extant evidences. The house comprises two main constructions situated in an east-west direction on either side of a long courtyard. In Pahlavi era a third building was constructed in the middle of the courtyard, used as spinning workshop in recent years. The eastern construction has a symmetrical and uncomplicated plan. A corridor in the south of this section connects the entrance to the courtyard. In the middle of the northern wall of the corridor, a door opens to the main room of the eastern section. The room embodies wooden adornments on the ceiling and an exquisite stucco carved fireplace in the eastern face. There’s a smaller room including less adornments situated in the north of the aforementioned room. The basement’s plan of the edifice, resembles the ground floor plan, which has three intricate rooms presumably used for service. West construction includes the entrance, a Hoz Khaneh and dais spaces around it. The layout of this section is reminiscent of Shekam Darideh (disemboweled) scheme, resembling a cross shape. The middle part of Hoz Khaneh is roofed over with a dome. Ornate stucco carvings completely cover the walls which are severely damaged in the dome section. The ceiling of the daises are adorned with moqarnas, inimitable in delicacy. The room is filled with a flooring of fine Haft-Rang tiles. The plinths had been covered with lusterware tiles, which currently very few of them are remained. The south west corner of Hoz Khaneh leads to along narrow corridor in a L shape. The end of it is closed and its function is indeterminate. Presumably this corridor had been connected to another courtyard that is later segregated from the building. According to aerial photos in 1335 and evidences like stone socles, a three-span Iwan including four columns had been situated in front of the western construction, which the central span was covered with a crescent roof. The remains of a crescent pediment on the central part of the elevation of this section is another evidence that confirms the existence of the Iwan. Courtyard: There are no traces left of the vegetation and initial design of the courtyard, although there are remnants of arcades around it. The upper part of the arches are covered with Haft-Rang tiles. Keywords: Shekam Darideh, stucco carving, moqarnas, Iwan, Haft-Rang tile, lusterware tile
documents
MBQ28

Google code : 


Description :
HBM14b

Google code : 


Description :
RAS29

Google code : 


Description :
HAT28

Google code : 


Description :
CAB33

Google code : 


Description :
HBF17

Google code : 


Description :
This house belongs to early to mid Qajar period and was probably a part of Motamed-ol-Molk residence that has been detached later from the original complex. It comprises two courtyards, a double floor height Talar (Hall), a large basement and two wind catchers. The first courtyard situated to the east of the lot is directly connected to Sadat alley and serves as a semi open entrance space. This part shows almost no evidence of the historical constructions. A long corridor connects the courtyard to the second (main) courtyard, along which two small rectangular rooms are located. Main courtyard is almost three times larger than the entrance courtyard and has constructions on three sides. The southern wing constitutes two interconnected room, beside which the entrance corridor, mentioned above, is located. Northern wing has three interconnected rooms in the first floor, the middle one being larger than the two flanking rooms. Eight steps connect the rooms to the courtyard level. We were not permitted to enter to this part, so nothing can be stated about the dimensions, shapes and other details. This plan is almost replicated in the basement. Here the larger room is similarly located at the middle and is directly accessible through courtyard. The other two also looks towards the courtyard. This arrangement extends further westward with a long rectangular room adjacent to the northern flanking room which traverses the whole width of the western wing and in connected both to the courtyard and the western wing basement. Beautiful patterns of brick work adorned with little square blue tiles decorate the ceiling of the rooms. West wing consisted of a double floor height Talar flanked on sides by two corridors and two smaller rooms. The flanking rooms and corridors are repeated in the second floor. The basement includes a large room under the Talar built with similar size and shape to Talar. Here likewise the north wing basement, beautiful brick works with adorns the ceiling of the room. A pattern of parallel diagonal lines has been executed on the ceiling by colouring certain bricks on each course in red. Upper rooms are almost devoid of decorations, except for stucco carved stalactites (Moqarnas) in the upper side of recesses. Two wind catchers above the Talar provided fresh and cool air for the interior space. The sind catcher duct extends downwards to the ceiling of the basement room. Courtyard is well-preserved and showcases many of the specifications of the traditional outdoor space design. It has a circular Howz in the middle surrounded by four plant beds. The whole area is paved with large square mud bricks (Ajor Nezami) Vegetation includes a tall old pin tree and several ailanthuses.

Google code : 
404

Description :